Climate Tanks™

Climate Tanks™ Liquid and Chemical Tanks

As standard stainless steel, glass fused to steel, epoxy coated, weathered finish, powder coated, or galvanized Climate Tanks™ are equipped with 4″ inlet, 2″ outlet, 4″ overflow nozzles. According to customer requirements connections are adapted to the project specification.

Description

Stainless steel tanks are storage devices that are used to hold a large range of substances. Many industries use stainless steel tanks to hold substances such as chemicals, gases, food, water, and other bulk materials. Industries that rely heavily on stainless steel tanks include pharmaceutical companies, the food and beverage industry, agriculture, and sewage and wastewater companies. Stainless steel is the favored material of many industries for producing storage tanks because of its relative ease of use and flexibility. Stainless steel is prized for its ability to prevent corrosion, which makes it the ideal substance for storing hazardous materials. Stainless steel is also popular for its ability to resist extreme temperatures. To make stainless steel, the raw materials: iron ore, chromium, silicon, nickel, etc. are melted together in an electric furnace. This step usually involves 8 to 12 hours of intense heat. Stainless steel is considered an environmentally friendly material since the production process utilizes natural resources and energy. Storage tanks made entirely of stainless steel are eco-friendly and 100% recyclable. Not only are stainless steel water tanks easy to clean, but they are also much more hygienic than tanks constructed of other materials. If a tank is keeping water, food, or any other product inside, it’s imperative to ensure the hygiene and purity at all times. Despite its durability, stainless steel can be bent, rolled, and shaped to fit all kinds of customized needs. Additionally, tanks can be designed in a wide variety of diameters, lengths, and heights, which offers flexibility for many industries with unique storage requirements. Stainless steel chemical tanks can maintain their shape and properties over an extended period of time, as well as over a wide range of temperatures, especially at extremely cold temperatures. Also, this material is less affected by UV light, which can significantly damage chemical storage tanks made of other materials.

Glass Fused to Steel (GFS) is glass that has been fired (heat-processed) in a kiln at a range of high temperatures from 593 °C (1,099 °F) to 816 °C (1,501 °F). There are 3 main distinctions for temperature application and the resulting effect on the glass. Firing in the lower ranges of these temperatures 593–677 °C (1,099–1,251 °F) is called slumping. Firing in the middle ranges of these temperatures 677–732 °C (1,251–1,350 °F) is considered “tack fusing”. Firing the glass at the higher part of this range 732–816 °C (1,350–1,501 °F) is commonly described as a “full fuse”. All of these techniques can be applied to one glass work in separate firings to add depth, relief and shape. Disparate pieces of glass must be compatible in order to ensure they can be fused properly. It is a common misconception that glasses having the same coefficient of expansion (COE) will be compatible. Coefficient of expansion is one indicator that glasses may be compatible, but there are many other factors that determine whether glasses are compatible. If incompatible glasses are fused together, it is unlikely that the fused piece will be able maintain structural integrity. The piece may shatter during the cooling process, or develop stress originating from the point of contact between the incompatible glasses over time, leading to fractures within the glass, and eventually breakage. Generally, kiln-glass manufacturers will rate their glasses for compatibility with other glasses they make. In order to be certain that the glasses they use will be compatible, many glass fusers will adopt one manufacturer’s glasses to use exclusively. The stress in two pieces of incompatible glass that were fused can be observed by placing the item between two polarizing filters. This will show areas of tension which will develop stress and fracture over time.

Epoxy Coated is either any of the basic components or the cured end products of epoxy resins, as well as a colloquial name for the epoxide functional group. Epoxy resins, also known as polyepoxides, are a class of reactive prepolymers and polymers which contain epoxide groups. Epoxy resins may be reacted (cross-linked) either with themselves through catalytic homopolymerisation, or with a wide range of co-reactants including polyfunctional amines, acids (and acid anhydrides), phenols, alcohols and thiols. These co-reactants are often referred to as hardeners or curatives, and the cross-linking reaction is commonly referred to as curing. Reaction of polyepoxides with themselves or with polyfunctional hardeners forms a thermosetting polymer, often with high mechanical properties, temperature and chemical resistance. Epoxy has a wide range of applications, including metal coatings, use in electronics / electrical components/LED, high tension electrical insulators, paint brushes manufacturing, fiber-reinforced plastic materials and structural adhesives. The applications for epoxy-based materials are extensive and include coatings, adhesives and composite materials such as those using carbon fiber and fiberglass reinforcements (although polyester, vinyl ester, and other thermosetting resins are also used for glass-reinforced plastic). The chemistry of epoxies and the range of commercially available variations allows cure polymers to be produced with a very broad range of properties. In general, epoxies are known for their excellent adhesion, chemical and heat resistance, good-to-excellent mechanical properties and very good electrical insulating properties. Many properties of epoxies can be modified (for example silver-filled epoxies with good electrical conductivity are available, although epoxies are typically electrically insulating). Variations offering high thermal insulation, or thermal conductivity combined with high electrical resistance for electronics applications, are available.

Weathered Finish Steel, often referred to by the generalized trademark COR-TEN steel and sometimes written without the hyphen as corten steel, is a group of steel alloys which were developed to eliminate the need for painting, and form a stable rust-like appearance if exposed to the weather for several years. Weathering refers to the chemical composition of these steels, allowing them to exhibit increased resistance to atmospheric corrosion compared to other steels. This is because the steel forms a protective layer on its surface under the influence of the weather.
The corrosion-retarding effect of the protective layer is produced by the particular distribution and concentration of alloying elements in it. The layer protecting the surface develops and regenerates continuously when subjected to the influence of the weather. In other words, the steel is allowed to rust in order to form the protective coating; all of these Climate products are delivered un-patinated. It is very widely used in marine transportation, in the construction of intermodal containers as well as visible sheet piling along recently widened sections of London’s M25 motorway. The first use of weathering steel for architectural applications was the John Deere World Headquarters in Moline, Illinois. The use of weathering steel was seen as a cost-cutting move in comparison with the contemporary railcar standard of stainless steel. Weathering steel was used to build the exterior of Barclays Center, made up of 12,000 pre-weathered steel panels engineered by ASI Limited & SHoP Construction. The New York Times says of the material, “While it can look suspiciously unfinished to the casual observer, it has many fans in the world of art and architecture.”

Powder Coating is a type of coating that is applied as a free-flowing, dry powder. The main difference between a conventional liquid paint and a powder coating is that the powder coating does not require a solvent to keep the binder and filler parts in a liquid suspension form. The coating is typically applied electrostatically and is then cured under heat to allow it to flow and form a “skin”. The powder may be a thermoplastic or a thermoset polymer. It is usually used to create a hard finish that is tougher than conventional paint. Powder coating is mainly used for coating of metals, such as household appliances, aluminum extrusions, drum hardware, and automobile and bicycle parts. There are two main categories of powder coating: thermosets and thermoplastics. The thermosetting variety incorporates a cross-linker into the formulation. When the powder is baked, it reacts with other chemical groups in the powder to polymerize, improving the performance properties. The thermoplastic variety does not undergo any additional actions during the baking process as it flows to form the final coating. The most common polymers used are polyester, polyurethane, polyester-epoxy (known as hybrid), straight epoxy (fusion bonded epoxy) and acrylics.

Galvanized Coated tanks is engineered to your site’s specification and installed by a trained crew. Galvanized bolted steel tanks have been the workhorse in the liquid storage industry for many years. These tanks are fabricated with galvanized steel panels bolted together making them economical, easy to transport to project site, easy to erect, and have a long lasting interior and exterior finish. Tank bolts have a high tensile strength ponds per square inch and are available in three finishes: hot-dipped galvanized, encapsulated & stainless steel. For resistance to a variety of liquids such as water, waste water and oils, several liner materials are available including ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM), butyl, and poly vinyl chloride (PVC) with or without NSF 61 Potable Certification. Tank nozzle and MaxAccess™ XXL (side manways) gaskets are precision punched to fit exactly and are formulated to remain flexible and not separate from the tank surface. Climate Tanks™ steel bolted tanks meet and exceed a number of industry standards including American Water Works Association (AWWA) D103, National Fire Prevention Association (NFPA 22), FM Approvals, European Union (EN), and can be used for a variety of applications including potable water, wastewater, fire protection systems, slurry and agricultural, mining, ClimaHarvest™ (rainwater and stormwater harvesting), dry bulk, certain chemicals, processing, cooling tower and blow down, and many more applications.